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Bike Gear Chart

When you buy a new bike or change either the Chain Rings or Cogs on your bike you are potentially changing your riding power. 

In order to determine the effect of changes to your Chain Rings or Cogs you will need to make a Gear Chart.  You will need to know the size of your wheels, the size of your Chain Rings (number of teeth) and the size of your Cogs (number of teeth).

The size of the Chain Ring may be stamped on the Chain Ring.  If not, you will need to count the number of teeth on each of your Chain Rings.  You will also need to count the number of teeth on each of your Cogs.  Write these numbers down on a piece of paper.  Write the Chain Rings across the top of the paper and the Cogs down the side of the paper

Find your wheel size – most bikes are either 27” (700c) or 26” (650).  The wheel size will be on the side wall of your tire.

Cogs
Chain Rings

55

42

34

12

119

91

74

13

110

84

68

14

102

78

63

15

95

73

59

17

84

64

52

19

75

57

47

21

68

52

42

24

60

46

37

27

53

40

33

Now, perform the following calculation for each combination of Chain Ring and Cog.  Fill in the results in each of the boxes.

(Chain Ring x Wheel Size) / Cog

Chain Rings: 55, 42, 34

Cogs: 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 21, 24, 25

Wheel Size: 26 inches

Big Chain Ring (55) and Smallest Cog (12) –

55 x 26 = 1430

1430 / 12 = 119 inches per pedal revolution

Small Chain Ring (34) and Largest Cog (27) –

34 x 26 = 884

884 / 27 = 33 inches per pedal revolution

Find the Cog you ride in the most and find the chain ring you ride in most.  I’ve indicated that as:

57

Now, repeat the steps for your new Chain Rings and/or Cogs.  Find the gears you ride in most frequently on your new chart.  Also, compare the biggest gear (hardest) and the smallest gear (easiest).  If the smallest gear is larger than the old one, you will loose climbing ability – the new gearing will be harder to climb with. 

33

If the largest gear is smaller than the old one, you will loose speed – the new gearing will not provide as much speed as your old one.

119

Now you have the means to compare one bike’s gearing to another bike’s gearing.

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